My MAC Experience: The Conclusion | Why I'm No Longer working as a M.A.C Girl...

By | 10/23/2015 6 comments

HELLO BEAUTIES!


After receiving tens of thousands of hits and about hundreds of emails, my MAC interview and MAC Hiring Experience posts are very popular here on the blog. So I figured it was time to come to you all with an update. I first would like to say how happy/proud I am for those who have landed a job at MAC and took the time to email me, comment or find me on Instagram to thank me for those posts. If you find yourself here on this post, this is MY experience and it should not sway you to leave your job at MAC in any way. I mean, if that's what YOU want to do, go ahead. You may have been wanting to do so for a long time. Just make sure the decision you make is because its truly what you want to do. 

Before I get into why, here's the back story...

I believe the first time I thought about being a Makeup Artist was during my very first visit to a MAC Counter in 2011. The artist that helped me was very nice, and she matched my foundation perfectly. I had never wore foundation before so when she put it on, like any makeup newbie I was stunned at how good it looked. I loved how I felt, the artist, the environment, everyones individual style, etc. So, I said to myself, "I'm going to work here!"

So I went home and pulled out the one palette I had and got to work. Like any makeup artist, when I go and look back at those pictures that I proudly posted on Facebook with 12,000 colors on my eyelid, I want to scream. (LOL) I just want to take this time to call all my friends out for not being there for me and letting me know that I looked a hot mess. 

Any-who, I knew that I wanted to work for MAC and I knew in order to do so I must come correct. So I dedicated my time to mastering all skin types and tones so that I would be ready for any one who came to my counter (when I got the job). Problem is, I'm a perfectionist and it took 2 years of me playing in makeup to get the courage to apply for mac. What's interesting is during that 2 years, I had gained a following as an Artist and Blogger. I didn't NEED to work at MAC anymore, however I still wanted to. No matter how many people told me I was "big time now because I did a magazine cover with Porsha Stewart now Williams" (so not big time) I didn't care. Even though I had work, I decided to apply anyway. No matter what I had done, the reason why I began playing in makeup was because I wanted to be a MAC Girl. The way I looked at it, I hadn't done what I set out to do, meaning I had accomplished nothing...or at least not the original goal at hand. I had to prove to myself that I could do it, and I did. 

Working for MAC...

...was fun! Not at all what I expected, but definitely fun. It was nothing I imagined it to be. I was warned by other MAC heads, but I didn't listen. When it comes relationships/experiences, no matter what any one tells me about an individual or place of business I don't take their word for it. I like to find out on my own. So what did I discover?

  1. I loved working as a freelancer. I never wanted to be a full time artist because of how much time they require you to be at the store.
  2. Freelancers don't get any kind of training. You're just thrown in with no life jacket. Forcing you to catch up and keep up...QUICK.
  3. Mac isn't about the "ART", it was about sales. I don't mind selling, I just didn't like that 9/10 women left disappointed because they hated their makeup. Those artists knew how to sell, but some couldn't paint at all. This was really hard for me to deal with.
  4. Mac requires a lot of time during the holidays. With me having two little kids, this was non-negotiable. If I didn't have anything to fall back on I would've been sad, but I would've worked. But because I had my own business to fall back on, I refused to work holidays. This won't get you fired, but as a freelancer less hours will be handed to you if you always seem unavailable, especially during the holidays.
  5. I didn't need to stay to keep/get a discount as I already had 40% off with my pro card. 
These are just a few of my pros and cons...
Working for MAC was difficult for me because I already had my own makeup career going on outside of the store. On top of like I said, having 2 kids under the age of 2 and a husband recovering from a life threatening illness. Unlike most artists there (no shade at all), I was working as a Makeup Artist outside the counter. Not everyone has to or prefers to, this is just what I had going on at the time. I was use to setting my own hours, working when I wanted to and charging what I wanted to charge. Also, after working with Lelee of SWV (90's R&B Legends for my young readers) for their reality show, she was requesting my services outside of the show. So I was like hmmm, do I go to the counter or do I go to Lelee. I could never do both, because I had to get home to my kids. I could go on forever. Point is I left because life was happening around me and I didn't want to miss it. 

All this to say, my main reason for no longer being on the schedule at MAC is because I have a family. I had to chose between MAC and my pro career that was beginning to take off. Could I have done both, definitely! However, I was not willing to spend that much time away from my family. Now that my kids are older and in school/daycare, It would be easier to return. However, I still have an issue with working holidays, (oh yeah!) and Saturdays as I'm a Sabbath keeper, and at this point in my life its not needed. I do miss it though! I met some amazing people, learned a lot, and accomplished my original goal as a makeup artist. 

If life turns on me to where I need to go back, I can and will! This is why I'll remain listed on as a freelancer. The last shift I worked at MAC was about a year ago. 

Please share your MAC experiences with me below. ESPECIALLY if you have a family! How do you balance the demands of the job and still be present for your family?


Thanks for reading...
<3 Bee




6 comments : Leave Your Comments

  1. This is a great article Bee! I've been waiting for the follow up. My story is similar, I started about 3 years ago and didn't have the nerve to apply until I was confident in my work. Plus, I'm a mom with two children (now 10&6) which would have been extremely hard for me to be away from them 3 years ago. Anyhoo, I've established myself and brand in the past 3 years and built an amazing portfolio, which led me to muster the courage to apply for MAC a month ago. I was called a week later and they told me I got the job. The guy who interviewed asked me specifically about my lige and I told him "I'm a wife, a mom, and a Christian." Lol He immediately told me that Freelancer would be perfect. I won't officially start until the first week in November, which I'm nervous and excited about but the holiday season is what worries me more. My children have grown mature and understand that I have to go and work when needed but I'm mainly a always available to them because I've been my own boss. What do I to for the brides who have already booked me? Do I just tell them I can't come in? How soon prior do they give schedules to Freelancers? Is the pay really comparable to what I make now?

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    1. Hi Brittany! Congratulations on having your own business, awesome portfolio AND NOW being hired at MAC! Great questions. When I was hired, I let it be known that I had been working as a makeup artist already and I have pre-booked dates. I then give them a list of dates that I was already booked for. That's the glory of being a freelancer. You do not have to work if you don't want to. When they make your schedule/ ask if you are free on whatever date, you can say no! They won't ask questions nor will you get fired. I loved that! LOL Hours as a freelancer come and go, also they aren't always guaranteed. Weigh your options/opportunities as they come in. Work enough hours that know you're fair, available, and genuinely interested in working in their store. If you say know or call out one too many times, they could stop asking you to come in or take you off the schedule all together. The ball is truly in your court! As far as pay, I don't know what you make now to determine that. But hey, if you have a day with no clients, take a shift. Nothing is ever wrong with extra money. Good luck girlie and keep me posted on your journey. - Bee

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  2. I love that you keep it honest Bee! I've teetered back and forth with the notion of pursuing makeup artistry. It's still a sore spot for myself personally because I feel as though I am allowing my insecurities with my craft to keep me from becoming better. I've written it off as it not being a passion when really I'm just afraid I'll never be good enough. I had the same trepidation about applying to MAC, but ultimately I made the decision that the sales part of it would eventually dull my drive so I didn't. Your work is amazing and I love to live vicariously through your makeup posts and still try to perfect my own application with your tips. Maybe I'll stop being afraid and go for it again, only time will tell:) Keep it up!

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  3. Omgggg this was very good. I worked for MAC and have a similar story. I had my first MAC experience in 2006. After that I wanted to work for them and it did not happen until October 2012. I am a Christian and mom so there were times I felt I had to sell and be like everyone else. They would have theme days and sometimes the outfits they wanted would be like u mmmm can you see the Holy Ghost in me or is this outfit selling you sex more lol Also, I felt I had to comfort to the MAC way. By no means am I trying to discourage anyone who reads my comment but I'm just saying. I just wanted to do make up and slay, laugh and talk about the goodness and mercy of Jesus. I do like the whole you are not an artist unless you worked for MAC or you have arrived once you worked for MAC. Smh I had fun and truly felt the whole expression of "do what you love and you'll never work again" quote. Since I work at a Bank when I'm there I am truly working and do not like it at all. MAC all in all is cool, but if you want to become a better artist it is outside and away from MAC. Folks come to you buy product get a full face $50 come back and return everything and it effects the artist sells goal. Smh also not many christian's that truly wanted to go and be at church they were heavily involved in their "MAC Life" and I was like nah bruh I'm good and never excepted a freelance hour in over a year.

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  4. This is the struggle of a Mom and MAC girl! I have been freelancing for the past year while building my business on the side and I honestly dont know how I do it. Fortunately I keep getting called back because of My sales ability but much like you, I care about the art. Luckily Ive learned how to give good face while moving product. I salute you for making the decision to step away and hope to be not that far behind you! When I weigh the price Im paid for my work in my business vs the counter I have to scratch my head. Its not worth being away from my baby boy. Its a personal goal fulfilled but everything has a season. By the way, it was amazing meeting you at the Fine/Vasquez seminar!

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  5. This is the struggle of a Mom and MAC girl! I have been freelancing for the past year while building my business on the side and I honestly dont know how I do it. Fortunately I keep getting called back because of My sales ability but much like you, I care about the art. Luckily Ive learned how to give good face while moving product. I salute you for making the decision to step away and hope to be not that far behind you! When I weigh the price Im paid for my work in my business vs the counter I have to scratch my head. Its not worth being away from my baby boy. Its a personal goal fulfilled but everything has a season. By the way, it was amazing meeting you at the Fine/Vasquez seminar!

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